Dielectric Paint


Dielectric materials that function over wide temperature ranges are increasingly sought to enable the performance of next-generation technology, from intelligent and mobile computing, communication, and entertainment devices to improvements and modernization of already-mature industrial technologies. Market-entry barriers that limit the use of these materials are primarily thermal performance and cost, and Cerablak™ technology addresses both along with offering ease of deposition on a commercial scale.

 

High Temperature Electrical Insulator Considerations
Thermally-stable dielectric coatings are becoming critical in many applications, including emerging electric vehicles. These coatings need to withstand extensive thermal cycling and offer sustained dielectric performance at high temperatures. A large fraction of the currently-available dielectric coating products contain polymeric materials, which degrade readily at elevated temperatures (>200°C). Most ceramic coatings that are stable at elevated temperatures suffer from poor dielectric performance due to inherent porosity or are too expensive to deposit high-quality dielectric coatings.

 

Dielectric coatings also help prevent galvanic corrosion and, in many applications, thermal cycling is required, which exacerbates the corrosion problem. Thus, a unique coating to provide dielectric properties in combination with corrosion protection is an industry need. To that end, a broad trend is emerging across many industries for relatively “thin” thermally-stable dielectric coatings that can be applied in an environmentally-friendly and economical way.

 

Our Solution:  Cerablak® HTP
Cerablak® HTP is an easy-to-apply spray-on paint with excellent dielectric properties, and is stable up to 500°C in thermal cycling conditions.  With breakdown strengths exceeding 300 V(AC)/mil on aluminum, steel, and other alloys, Cerablak® HTP offers immediate solutions to tough thermal challenges across many industry platforms.  Cerablak® HTP is available in various architectures, such as a low-thickness dense coating (<1micron) or as a thicker composite coating (<5 mils).